Blog posts tagged with: Andrew Clifford

Posted Aug 12, 2013
By
Mark Amery

In this months edition of CIRCUIT CAST the pod deliver an extended onsite discussion from the Auckland Art Fair. Host Mark Amery is joined by Andrew Clifford (Curator, Gus Fisher Gallery) and visiting ex-patriate Serena Bentley (Curator, Next Wave Festival, Melbourne). In part 1 the pod discuss the Art Fair's place in the wider art ecology and wonder where are all the dealers this year? In part 2 they reflect on highlights, and in part 3 they address the puzzling absence of the moving image in this years event.

Posted May 20, 2013
By
Mark Amery
Angelica Mesiti Citizens Band, 2012 (still) four channel video installation; high definition video, 16:9, PAL, surround sound duration: 21mins 25secs

NZ's finest art podcast returns! This month; the Auckland Triennial has kicked off promising a glimpse of Auckland's future - but does it deliver? Andrew Clifford reports. Down in the capital Thomasin Sleigh and Michelle Menzies look at Samin Son TV; no doubt a fierce live performer but does it work on video?

Posted Apr 18, 2013
By
Mark Amery
Installation Shot: The Destroyed Word by Santiago Sierra

CRITICS & CRITICISM: This month Mark Amery & guests address the vexed issue of Criticism in New Zealand and Australia. Has the proliferation of new art forms made it difficult to critique art? How do we develop bold young critical voices? Should we fight for space in the shrinking profit margins of the newspaper? Should we simply pitch our tent in a friendly corner of the internet? 

Posted Jun 7, 2012
By
Miriam Harris
Eyes on the Moon: Jill Kennedy

Jill Kennedy's Eyes on the Moon is a series of evocative, rich, and absurd animations that gained resonance alongside two other exhibitions recently scheduled at Auckland's Gus Fisher Gallery.

Ballast: Bringing the Stones Home presented a collection of John Edgar sculptures forged from stone collected by the artist in historic Scottish quarries. In Paper-jams: artists between the covers various artists explored the book’s identity as a sculptural object.