Blog posts tagged with: Capitalism

Posted Apr 7, 2021
By
Mark Williams
Installation detail: Wong Ping, Wong Ping's Fables 1 (2018) . Courtesy the artist and Edouard Malingue Gallery, Hong Kong / Shanghai; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles. Photography by Sam Hartnett. Image courtesy of Gus Fisher Gallery, happiness is only real when shared (2021)

happiness is only real when shared is a follow up to We’re Not Too Big To Care, the inaugural exhibition curated by Lisa Beauchamp when she first took the reins of Gus Fisher Gallery in 2019. In the barely two years that have passed between these exhibitions, the world has been altered to such a degree that ‘business as usual’ is a state that we can barely hope to return to.

Posted Apr 7, 2021
By
Mark Williams
Installation detail: Wong Ping, Wong Ping's Fables 1 (2018) . Courtesy the artist and Edouard Malingue Gallery, Hong Kong / Shanghai; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles. Photography by Sam Hartnett. Image courtesy of Gus Fisher Gallery, happiness is only real when shared (2021)

happiness is only real when shared is a follow up to We’re Not Too Big To Care, the inaugural exhibition curated by Lisa Beauchamp when she first took the reins of Gus Fisher Gallery in 2019. In the barely two years that have passed between these exhibitions, the world has been altered to such a degree that ‘business as usual’ is a state that we can barely hope to return to.

Posted Apr 7, 2021
By
Mark Williams
Installation detail: Wong Ping, Wong Ping's Fables 1 (2018) . Courtesy the artist and Edouard Malingue Gallery, Hong Kong / Shanghai; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles. Photography by Sam Hartnett. Image courtesy of Gus Fisher Gallery, happiness is only real when shared (2021)

happiness is only real when shared is a follow up to We’re Not Too Big To Care, the inaugural exhibition curated by Lisa Beauchamp when she first took the reins of Gus Fisher Gallery in 2019. In the barely two years that have passed between these exhibitions, the world has been altered to such a degree that ‘business as usual’ is a state that we can barely hope to return to.

Posted Apr 7, 2021
By
Mark Williams
Installation detail: Wong Ping, Wong Ping's Fables 1 (2018) . Courtesy the artist and Edouard Malingue Gallery, Hong Kong / Shanghai; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles. Photography by Sam Hartnett. Image courtesy of Gus Fisher Gallery, happiness is only real when shared (2021)

happiness is only real when shared is a follow up to We’re Not Too Big To Care, the inaugural exhibition curated by Lisa Beauchamp when she first took the reins of Gus Fisher Gallery in 2019. In the barely two years that have passed between these exhibitions, the world has been altered to such a degree that ‘business as usual’ is a state that we can barely hope to return to.

Posted Feb 12, 2014
By
Tim Corballis
Still from War-Fi Cowboys (2010) Peter Wareing

There is a way, suggested by Hito Steyerl, to think about video art. As cinema enters the gallery, no audience can sit out its full duration—instead, it is exploded across multiple channels, so that the wandering viewer is asked to catch limited glimpses of all its parts simultaneously. No final understanding of the work is available, no narrative wound up in tidy conclusion.

Posted Feb 12, 2014
By
Tim Corballis
Still from War-Fi Cowboys (2010) Peter Wareing

There is a way, suggested by Hito Steyerl, to think about video art. As cinema enters the gallery, no audience can sit out its full duration—instead, it is exploded across multiple channels, so that the wandering viewer is asked to catch limited glimpses of all its parts simultaneously. No final understanding of the work is available, no narrative wound up in tidy conclusion.

Posted Feb 12, 2014
By
Tim Corballis
Still from War-Fi Cowboys (2010) Peter Wareing

There is a way, suggested by Hito Steyerl, to think about video art. As cinema enters the gallery, no audience can sit out its full duration—instead, it is exploded across multiple channels, so that the wandering viewer is asked to catch limited glimpses of all its parts simultaneously. No final understanding of the work is available, no narrative wound up in tidy conclusion.

Posted Feb 12, 2014
By
Tim Corballis
Still from War-Fi Cowboys (2010) Peter Wareing

There is a way, suggested by Hito Steyerl, to think about video art. As cinema enters the gallery, no audience can sit out its full duration—instead, it is exploded across multiple channels, so that the wandering viewer is asked to catch limited glimpses of all its parts simultaneously. No final understanding of the work is available, no narrative wound up in tidy conclusion.