Blog posts tagged with: Art history

Posted Mar 3, 2021
By
Mark Amery
Detail: Annie Bradley, The Sea in Us (2020)

"...an impressive waterfall... was said to fall into the harbour there, capturing colour in its spray. Who needed public art?"

Walking from pre-European city pā sites to Masons Screen, Mark Amery considers three new public art commissions by Layne Waerea, Annie Bradley and Theo MacDonald, addressing uninvited visitors, bodily architecture and digital confessions.

Posted Mar 3, 2021
By
Mark Amery
Detail: Annie Bradley, The Sea in Us (2020)

"...an impressive waterfall... was said to fall into the harbour there, capturing colour in its spray. Who needed public art?"

Walking from pre-European city pā sites to Masons Screen, Mark Amery considers three new public art commissions by Layne Waerea, Annie Bradley and Theo MacDonald, addressing uninvited visitors, bodily architecture and digital confessions.

Posted Mar 3, 2021
By
Mark Amery
Detail: Annie Bradley, The Sea in Us (2020)

"...an impressive waterfall... was said to fall into the harbour there, capturing colour in its spray. Who needed public art?"

Walking from pre-European city pā sites to Masons Screen, Mark Amery considers three new public art commissions by Layne Waerea, Annie Bradley and Theo MacDonald, addressing uninvited visitors, bodily architecture and digital confessions.

Posted Mar 3, 2021
By
Mark Amery
Detail: Annie Bradley, The Sea in Us (2020)

"...an impressive waterfall... was said to fall into the harbour there, capturing colour in its spray. Who needed public art?"

Walking from pre-European city pā sites to Masons Screen, Mark Amery considers three new public art commissions by Layne Waerea, Annie Bradley and Theo MacDonald, addressing uninvited visitors, bodily architecture and digital confessions.

Posted Feb 20, 2014
By
Andrew Clifford
Julian Dashper, Untitled (Interviews) 2001-02, still from a double DVD in an edition of three

Towards the end of the second disk of Julian Dashper’s Untitled Interviews 2001-2002, Dashper contemplates the potential for documentation in a digital age. Should he keep all the emails he has exchanged with other artists, curators or institutions – we have the technology so why not? But if you keep everything, it becomes impossible to understand what you thought was important. Do you keep everything or do you edit it?

Posted Feb 20, 2014
By
Andrew Clifford
Julian Dashper, Untitled (Interviews) 2001-02, still from a double DVD in an edition of three

Towards the end of the second disk of Julian Dashper’s Untitled Interviews 2001-2002, Dashper contemplates the potential for documentation in a digital age. Should he keep all the emails he has exchanged with other artists, curators or institutions – we have the technology so why not? But if you keep everything, it becomes impossible to understand what you thought was important. Do you keep everything or do you edit it?

Posted Feb 20, 2014
By
Andrew Clifford
Julian Dashper, Untitled (Interviews) 2001-02, still from a double DVD in an edition of three

Towards the end of the second disk of Julian Dashper’s Untitled Interviews 2001-2002, Dashper contemplates the potential for documentation in a digital age. Should he keep all the emails he has exchanged with other artists, curators or institutions – we have the technology so why not? But if you keep everything, it becomes impossible to understand what you thought was important. Do you keep everything or do you edit it?

Posted Feb 20, 2014
By
Andrew Clifford
Julian Dashper, Untitled (Interviews) 2001-02, still from a double DVD in an edition of three

Towards the end of the second disk of Julian Dashper’s Untitled Interviews 2001-2002, Dashper contemplates the potential for documentation in a digital age. Should he keep all the emails he has exchanged with other artists, curators or institutions – we have the technology so why not? But if you keep everything, it becomes impossible to understand what you thought was important. Do you keep everything or do you edit it?

Posted Jun 27, 2013
By
Mark Amery

In this months CIRCUIT podcast your host Mark Amery welcomes Dick Whyte, who offers a brief and bruising shakedown on Warhol at Te Papa before discussing his remake of Tarantino's Pulp Fiction, drawn from over 400 You Tube fan videos.

Posted Jun 27, 2013
By
Mark Amery

In this months CIRCUIT podcast your host Mark Amery welcomes Dick Whyte, who offers a brief and bruising shakedown on Warhol at Te Papa before discussing his remake of Tarantino's Pulp Fiction, drawn from over 400 You Tube fan videos.

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