Blog posts tagged with: Technology

Posted Jan 20, 2021
By
Mark Williams
Installation Shot: James Charlton, THROWN (2020). Courtesy of Te Uru. Photo by Sam Hartnett

As we welcome James Charlton to CIRCUIT, we present this catalogue essay by Mark Williams on Charlton's 2020 installation THROWN. Originally commissioned by Te Uru, the essay explores the resonance of Charlton's recent work in a time of environmental breakdown and artificial intellingence. The essay also discusses the artists' earlier work in video, performance and sculpture, drawing connections with the New Zealand post-object movement of the 1970s, through to contemporaries including Yona Lee.

Posted Jan 20, 2021
By
Mark Williams
Installation Shot: James Charlton, THROWN (2020). Courtesy of Te Uru. Photo by Sam Hartnett

As we welcome James Charlton to CIRCUIT, we present this catalogue essay by Mark Williams on Charlton's 2020 installation THROWN. Originally commissioned by Te Uru, the essay explores the resonance of Charlton's recent work in a time of environmental breakdown and artificial intellingence. The essay also discusses the artists' earlier work in video, performance and sculpture, drawing connections with the New Zealand post-object movement of the 1970s, through to contemporaries including Yona Lee.

Posted Jan 20, 2021
By
Mark Williams
Installation Shot: James Charlton, THROWN (2020). Courtesy of Te Uru. Photo by Sam Hartnett

As we welcome James Charlton to CIRCUIT, we present this catalogue essay by Mark Williams on Charlton's 2020 installation THROWN. Originally commissioned by Te Uru, the essay explores the resonance of Charlton's recent work in a time of environmental breakdown and artificial intellingence. The essay also discusses the artists' earlier work in video, performance and sculpture, drawing connections with the New Zealand post-object movement of the 1970s, through to contemporaries including Yona Lee.

Posted Jan 20, 2021
By
Mark Williams
Installation Shot: James Charlton, THROWN (2020). Courtesy of Te Uru. Photo by Sam Hartnett

As we welcome James Charlton to CIRCUIT, we present this catalogue essay by Mark Williams on Charlton's 2020 installation THROWN. Originally commissioned by Te Uru, the essay explores the resonance of Charlton's recent work in a time of environmental breakdown and artificial intellingence. The essay also discusses the artists' earlier work in video, performance and sculpture, drawing connections with the New Zealand post-object movement of the 1970s, through to contemporaries including Yona Lee.

Posted Jul 28, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Sean Grattan, HADHAD (2012) CIRCUIT

Recently we invited film maker Sean Grattan and academic Manuel Shvartzberg Carrió to revisit Sean's 2012 film HADHAD, whose depiction of an unwelcome visitor now seems oddly prescient of a world dealing with Covid 19 and authoritarian politics. Ostensibly a horror movie, HADHAD depicts a group of American suburbanites whose lives are upended by a mysterious visitor. Neither human nor animal, the HADHAD crouches silently, offering no clues to its’ purpose or origin.

Posted Jul 28, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Sean Grattan, HADHAD (2012) CIRCUIT

Recently we invited film maker Sean Grattan and academic Manuel Shvartzberg Carrió to revisit Sean's 2012 film HADHAD, whose depiction of an unwelcome visitor now seems oddly prescient of a world dealing with Covid 19 and authoritarian politics. Ostensibly a horror movie, HADHAD depicts a group of American suburbanites whose lives are upended by a mysterious visitor. Neither human nor animal, the HADHAD crouches silently, offering no clues to its’ purpose or origin.

Posted Jul 28, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Sean Grattan, HADHAD (2012) CIRCUIT

Recently we invited film maker Sean Grattan and academic Manuel Shvartzberg Carrió to revisit Sean's 2012 film HADHAD, whose depiction of an unwelcome visitor now seems oddly prescient of a world dealing with Covid 19 and authoritarian politics. Ostensibly a horror movie, HADHAD depicts a group of American suburbanites whose lives are upended by a mysterious visitor. Neither human nor animal, the HADHAD crouches silently, offering no clues to its’ purpose or origin.

Posted Feb 20, 2014
By
Andrew Clifford
Julian Dashper, Untitled (Interviews) 2001-02, still from a double DVD in an edition of three

Towards the end of the second disk of Julian Dashper’s Untitled Interviews 2001-2002, Dashper contemplates the potential for documentation in a digital age. Should he keep all the emails he has exchanged with other artists, curators or institutions – we have the technology so why not? But if you keep everything, it becomes impossible to understand what you thought was important. Do you keep everything or do you edit it?

Posted Feb 20, 2014
By
Andrew Clifford
Julian Dashper, Untitled (Interviews) 2001-02, still from a double DVD in an edition of three

Towards the end of the second disk of Julian Dashper’s Untitled Interviews 2001-2002, Dashper contemplates the potential for documentation in a digital age. Should he keep all the emails he has exchanged with other artists, curators or institutions – we have the technology so why not? But if you keep everything, it becomes impossible to understand what you thought was important. Do you keep everything or do you edit it?

Posted Feb 20, 2014
By
Andrew Clifford
Julian Dashper, Untitled (Interviews) 2001-02, still from a double DVD in an edition of three

Towards the end of the second disk of Julian Dashper’s Untitled Interviews 2001-2002, Dashper contemplates the potential for documentation in a digital age. Should he keep all the emails he has exchanged with other artists, curators or institutions – we have the technology so why not? But if you keep everything, it becomes impossible to understand what you thought was important. Do you keep everything or do you edit it?

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