Blog posts tagged with: Body

Posted Jan 20, 2021
By
Mark Williams
Installation Shot: James Charlton, THROWN (2020). Courtesy of Te Uru. Photo by Sam Hartnett

As we welcome James Charlton to CIRCUIT, we present this catalogue essay by Mark Williams on Charlton's 2020 installation THROWN. Originally commissioned by Te Uru, the essay explores the resonance of Charlton's recent work in a time of environmental breakdown and artificial intellingence. The essay also discusses the artists' earlier work in video, performance and sculpture, drawing connections with the New Zealand post-object movement of the 1970s, through to contemporaries including Yona Lee.

Posted Sep 16, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Tanu Gago, TULOU BITCH (2020)

"The dichotomy presented for FAFSWAG... is the forced movement into a colonised space, an individualistic framework of social engagement through social media and other online portals; and yet the opportunity to utilise the tools of the western world to further engage more of the masses..." - Arpege Taratoa

Posted Sep 16, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Tanu Gago, TULOU BITCH (2020)

"The dichotomy presented for FAFSWAG... is the forced movement into a colonised space, an individualistic framework of social engagement through social media and other online portals; and yet the opportunity to utilise the tools of the western world to further engage more of the masses..." - Arpege Taratoa

Posted Sep 16, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Tanu Gago, TULOU BITCH (2020)

"The dichotomy presented for FAFSWAG... is the forced movement into a colonised space, an individualistic framework of social engagement through social media and other online portals; and yet the opportunity to utilise the tools of the western world to further engage more of the masses..." - Arpege Taratoa

Posted Sep 16, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Tanu Gago, TULOU BITCH (2020)

"The dichotomy presented for FAFSWAG... is the forced movement into a colonised space, an individualistic framework of social engagement through social media and other online portals; and yet the opportunity to utilise the tools of the western world to further engage more of the masses..." - Arpege Taratoa

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

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