Blog posts tagged with: Popular culture

Posted Sep 9, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Montage from Suzanne Tamaki, Taonga Talkback TV (2020)

"It just makes sense to ...reanimate the past and bring it into the present. Everything evolves, culture isn’t a harbour, it’s a journey and we’re part of that." - Suzanne Tamaki

(ex)CLAIM is an interview series by Israel Randell, in which she meets practitioners from Aotearoa whose work seeks to correct imbalances in our bi-cultural histories. In this first interview Suzanne Tamaki discusses a new suite of works made in response to Black Lives Matter.

Posted Sep 9, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Montage from Suzanne Tamaki, Taonga Talkback TV (2020)

"It just makes sense to ...reanimate the past and bring it into the present. Everything evolves, culture isn’t a harbour, it’s a journey and we’re part of that." - Suzanne Tamaki

(ex)CLAIM is an interview series by Israel Randell, in which she meets practitioners from Aotearoa whose work seeks to correct imbalances in our bi-cultural histories. In this first interview Suzanne Tamaki discusses a new suite of works made in response to Black Lives Matter.

Posted Sep 9, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Montage from Suzanne Tamaki, Taonga Talkback TV (2020)

"It just makes sense to ...reanimate the past and bring it into the present. Everything evolves, culture isn’t a harbour, it’s a journey and we’re part of that." - Suzanne Tamaki

(ex)CLAIM is an interview series by Israel Randell, in which she meets practitioners from Aotearoa whose work seeks to correct imbalances in our bi-cultural histories. In this first interview Suzanne Tamaki discusses a new suite of works made in response to Black Lives Matter.

Posted Sep 9, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Montage from Suzanne Tamaki, Taonga Talkback TV (2020)

"It just makes sense to ...reanimate the past and bring it into the present. Everything evolves, culture isn’t a harbour, it’s a journey and we’re part of that." - Suzanne Tamaki

(ex)CLAIM is an interview series by Israel Randell, in which she meets practitioners from Aotearoa whose work seeks to correct imbalances in our bi-cultural histories. In this first interview Suzanne Tamaki discusses a new suite of works made in response to Black Lives Matter.

Posted Sep 9, 2020
By
Mark Williams
Montage from Suzanne Tamaki, Taonga Talkback TV (2020)

"It just makes sense to ...reanimate the past and bring it into the present. Everything evolves, culture isn’t a harbour, it’s a journey and we’re part of that." - Suzanne Tamaki

(ex)CLAIM is an interview series by Israel Randell, in which she meets practitioners from Aotearoa whose work seeks to correct imbalances in our bi-cultural histories. In this first interview Suzanne Tamaki discusses a new suite of works made in response to Black Lives Matter.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

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