Blog posts tagged with: Landscape

Posted Jan 16, 2014
By
Abby Cunnane
Still from The Golden Fields (2010) Kim Pieters

If you could plan it, you’d wake up to a film like this. Though you wouldn’t actually wake up at all; you’d stay for a long time in the yellow saturated half-light of an evening which sends the sun slanting across fields so flat that they weigh the sky down. Half awake, the horizon tilts, just marginally, but with a finality like it’s the planet that’s tilted rather than the camera. There’s a sound like the sound of an organ, if you were inside of that organ, or inside the ear of someone who was inside that organ, or inside the sound of that organ waking up.

Posted Jan 16, 2014
By
Abby Cunnane
Still from The Golden Fields (2010) Kim Pieters

If you could plan it, you’d wake up to a film like this. Though you wouldn’t actually wake up at all; you’d stay for a long time in the yellow saturated half-light of an evening which sends the sun slanting across fields so flat that they weigh the sky down. Half awake, the horizon tilts, just marginally, but with a finality like it’s the planet that’s tilted rather than the camera. There’s a sound like the sound of an organ, if you were inside of that organ, or inside the ear of someone who was inside that organ, or inside the sound of that organ waking up.

Posted Jan 16, 2014
By
Abby Cunnane
Still from The Golden Fields (2010) Kim Pieters

If you could plan it, you’d wake up to a film like this. Though you wouldn’t actually wake up at all; you’d stay for a long time in the yellow saturated half-light of an evening which sends the sun slanting across fields so flat that they weigh the sky down. Half awake, the horizon tilts, just marginally, but with a finality like it’s the planet that’s tilted rather than the camera. There’s a sound like the sound of an organ, if you were inside of that organ, or inside the ear of someone who was inside that organ, or inside the sound of that organ waking up.

Posted Jul 11, 2013
By
Ryan Reynolds
Still from The Quarry, Gavin Hipkins, 2013. Image courtesy of the artist

The Death and Life of Great American Cities has been doing the rounds in Christchurch of late, in physical form and social media. It’s a 1961 book by urban studies activist Jane Jacobs, strongly condemning a certain 1950s brand of resource-hungry and ‘rationalist’ urban planning.

Posted Jul 11, 2013
By
Ryan Reynolds
Still from The Quarry, Gavin Hipkins, 2013. Image courtesy of the artist

The Death and Life of Great American Cities has been doing the rounds in Christchurch of late, in physical form and social media. It’s a 1961 book by urban studies activist Jane Jacobs, strongly condemning a certain 1950s brand of resource-hungry and ‘rationalist’ urban planning.

Posted Jul 11, 2013
By
Ryan Reynolds
Still from The Quarry, Gavin Hipkins, 2013. Image courtesy of the artist

The Death and Life of Great American Cities has been doing the rounds in Christchurch of late, in physical form and social media. It’s a 1961 book by urban studies activist Jane Jacobs, strongly condemning a certain 1950s brand of resource-hungry and ‘rationalist’ urban planning.

Posted May 27, 2013
By
Thomasin Sleigh
Alex Monteith, Green Island Big Wave Surfing, 2013. Courtesy of the artist

The word ‘immersive’ has always been problematic for me. I think because in some instances it has been anaesthetised by art speak (and I am guilty of this as much as anyone). A video installation or a sculptural installation is often described as ‘immersive’ simply because it takes up a large space, or uses a variety of layered materials, or bright, confrontational colours, or loud sound, or fast-paced, flickering images.

Posted May 27, 2013
By
Thomasin Sleigh
Alex Monteith, Green Island Big Wave Surfing, 2013. Courtesy of the artist

The word ‘immersive’ has always been problematic for me. I think because in some instances it has been anaesthetised by art speak (and I am guilty of this as much as anyone). A video installation or a sculptural installation is often described as ‘immersive’ simply because it takes up a large space, or uses a variety of layered materials, or bright, confrontational colours, or loud sound, or fast-paced, flickering images.

Posted May 27, 2013
By
Thomasin Sleigh
Alex Monteith, Green Island Big Wave Surfing, 2013. Courtesy of the artist

The word ‘immersive’ has always been problematic for me. I think because in some instances it has been anaesthetised by art speak (and I am guilty of this as much as anyone). A video installation or a sculptural installation is often described as ‘immersive’ simply because it takes up a large space, or uses a variety of layered materials, or bright, confrontational colours, or loud sound, or fast-paced, flickering images.

Posted Dec 7, 2012
By
Sandy Gibbs
Installation Shot: Murray Hewitt, Untitled (2011). Image courtesy of the artist. Photo: Hamish McLaren

The potent symbolism of full-face motorbike helmets exploded into our collective consciousness with the Springboks tour of 1981. Documentary photographs show police in full riot gear facing off against helmeted protestors – those divisive battlelines having since been described as the moment when New Zealand lost its innocence; also the moment that the full-face motorbike helmet become forever associated with protest and activism.

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