Blog posts tagged with: Internet and online

Posted Nov 11, 2020
By
Israel Randell
Still (detail), Kahurangiariki Smith, MāoriGrl (video game demo) (2017)

"Making video games about our old stories, especially if the mahi is also a bit cheeky, I always wonder “Am I gonna get in trouble for this?" - Kahurangiariki Smith

(ex)CLAIM is an interview series by Israel Randell, in which she meets practitioners from Aotearoa whose work seeks to correct imbalances in our bi-cultural histories. In this interview she meets Kahurangiariki Smith.

Posted Nov 11, 2020
By
Israel Randell
Still (detail), Kahurangiariki Smith, MāoriGrl (video game demo) (2017)

"Making video games about our old stories, especially if the mahi is also a bit cheeky, I always wonder “Am I gonna get in trouble for this?" - Kahurangiariki Smith

(ex)CLAIM is an interview series by Israel Randell, in which she meets practitioners from Aotearoa whose work seeks to correct imbalances in our bi-cultural histories. In this interview she meets Kahurangiariki Smith.

Posted Nov 11, 2020
By
Israel Randell
Still (detail), Kahurangiariki Smith, MāoriGrl (video game demo) (2017)

"Making video games about our old stories, especially if the mahi is also a bit cheeky, I always wonder “Am I gonna get in trouble for this?" - Kahurangiariki Smith

(ex)CLAIM is an interview series by Israel Randell, in which she meets practitioners from Aotearoa whose work seeks to correct imbalances in our bi-cultural histories. In this interview she meets Kahurangiariki Smith.

Posted Nov 11, 2020
By
Israel Randell
Still (detail), Kahurangiariki Smith, MāoriGrl (video game demo) (2017)

"Making video games about our old stories, especially if the mahi is also a bit cheeky, I always wonder “Am I gonna get in trouble for this?" - Kahurangiariki Smith

(ex)CLAIM is an interview series by Israel Randell, in which she meets practitioners from Aotearoa whose work seeks to correct imbalances in our bi-cultural histories. In this interview she meets Kahurangiariki Smith.

Posted Oct 30, 2020
By
Jasmine Gallagher
Nathan Pohio, Let it be to a Lofty Mountain (2020), Christchurch Arts Centre, 20-29 Aug 2020

"Gone is the pastiche and irony inherent to much postmodern New Zealand art of the 90’s... This has been replaced by art that allows elements of hope, sincerity and emotion to sit alongside the cynicism and rationality of more traditional forms of critique." - Jasmine Gallagher

Posted Oct 30, 2020
By
Jasmine Gallagher
Nathan Pohio, Let it be to a Lofty Mountain (2020), Christchurch Arts Centre, 20-29 Aug 2020

"Gone is the pastiche and irony inherent to much postmodern New Zealand art of the 90’s... This has been replaced by art that allows elements of hope, sincerity and emotion to sit alongside the cynicism and rationality of more traditional forms of critique." - Jasmine Gallagher

Posted Oct 30, 2020
By
Jasmine Gallagher
Nathan Pohio, Let it be to a Lofty Mountain (2020), Christchurch Arts Centre, 20-29 Aug 2020

"Gone is the pastiche and irony inherent to much postmodern New Zealand art of the 90’s... This has been replaced by art that allows elements of hope, sincerity and emotion to sit alongside the cynicism and rationality of more traditional forms of critique." - Jasmine Gallagher

Posted Oct 30, 2020
By
Jasmine Gallagher
Nathan Pohio, Let it be to a Lofty Mountain (2020), Christchurch Arts Centre, 20-29 Aug 2020

"Gone is the pastiche and irony inherent to much postmodern New Zealand art of the 90’s... This has been replaced by art that allows elements of hope, sincerity and emotion to sit alongside the cynicism and rationality of more traditional forms of critique." - Jasmine Gallagher

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By
Robbie Handcock
Still from Popular Glory (2017) Zack Steiner-Fox

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

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