Blog posts tagged with: Literature and poetry

Posted Jun 13, 2013
By
Tessa Laird
Still from Form Next to Form Next to Form, Nova Paul 2013

Form Next to Form Next to Form is a publication by film maker Nova Paul (Ngāpuhi), which celebrates and re-presents her 16mm film This is not Dying from 2010. Turning a film into a book is an interesting proposition, but rather than explanations and stills, Form Next to Form Next to Form translates the hallucinatory language of the film into the print medium, creating a work that casts its own spell.

Posted Jun 13, 2013
By
Tessa Laird
Still from Form Next to Form Next to Form, Nova Paul 2013

Form Next to Form Next to Form is a publication by film maker Nova Paul (Ngāpuhi), which celebrates and re-presents her 16mm film This is not Dying from 2010. Turning a film into a book is an interesting proposition, but rather than explanations and stills, Form Next to Form Next to Form translates the hallucinatory language of the film into the print medium, creating a work that casts its own spell.

Posted Jun 13, 2013
By
Tessa Laird
Still from Form Next to Form Next to Form, Nova Paul 2013

Form Next to Form Next to Form is a publication by film maker Nova Paul (Ngāpuhi), which celebrates and re-presents her 16mm film This is not Dying from 2010. Turning a film into a book is an interesting proposition, but rather than explanations and stills, Form Next to Form Next to Form translates the hallucinatory language of the film into the print medium, creating a work that casts its own spell.

Posted Mar 13, 2013
By
Megan Dunn
Still from The Aachen Faxes, Marie Shannon, 2012

The Aachen Faxes (2012) is a simple striking video of white text on a black background. The text is taken from a series of faxes Julian Dashper sent to his partner Marie Shannon during his Aachen residency in 1995. The soundtrack is fittingly maudlin, a lone cello played by Dashper’s brother. The video is pitch perfect; the text exquisitely weighted across the screen as though set by a typographer onto a page.

Posted Mar 13, 2013
By
Megan Dunn
Still from The Aachen Faxes, Marie Shannon, 2012

The Aachen Faxes (2012) is a simple striking video of white text on a black background. The text is taken from a series of faxes Julian Dashper sent to his partner Marie Shannon during his Aachen residency in 1995. The soundtrack is fittingly maudlin, a lone cello played by Dashper’s brother. The video is pitch perfect; the text exquisitely weighted across the screen as though set by a typographer onto a page.

Posted Mar 13, 2013
By
Megan Dunn
Still from The Aachen Faxes, Marie Shannon, 2012

The Aachen Faxes (2012) is a simple striking video of white text on a black background. The text is taken from a series of faxes Julian Dashper sent to his partner Marie Shannon during his Aachen residency in 1995. The soundtrack is fittingly maudlin, a lone cello played by Dashper’s brother. The video is pitch perfect; the text exquisitely weighted across the screen as though set by a typographer onto a page.

Posted Mar 13, 2013
By
Megan Dunn
Still from The Aachen Faxes, Marie Shannon, 2012

The Aachen Faxes (2012) is a simple striking video of white text on a black background. The text is taken from a series of faxes Julian Dashper sent to his partner Marie Shannon during his Aachen residency in 1995. The soundtrack is fittingly maudlin, a lone cello played by Dashper’s brother. The video is pitch perfect; the text exquisitely weighted across the screen as though set by a typographer onto a page.

Posted Mar 15, 2012
By
Mark Williams
Still from Burnings (2005)

Murray Hewitt's videos mix social commentary with a healthy dose of humour and absurdism. His work reflects on the excesses of late 20th century capitalism, the lingering effects of colonisation and points of conflict in contemporary New Zealand. In the video below, excerpts from his work are interspersed with discussion about his working processes, including his consultation with Māori over the use of the Raukura peace symbol left by the prophets Te Whiti-o-Rongomai and Tohu Kakahi of Parihaka.

Posted Mar 15, 2012
By
Mark Williams
Still from Burnings (2005)

Murray Hewitt's videos mix social commentary with a healthy dose of humour and absurdism. His work reflects on the excesses of late 20th century capitalism, the lingering effects of colonisation and points of conflict in contemporary New Zealand. In the video below, excerpts from his work are interspersed with discussion about his working processes, including his consultation with Māori over the use of the Raukura peace symbol left by the prophets Te Whiti-o-Rongomai and Tohu Kakahi of Parihaka.

Posted Mar 15, 2012
By
Mark Williams
Still from Burnings (2005)

Murray Hewitt's videos mix social commentary with a healthy dose of humour and absurdism. His work reflects on the excesses of late 20th century capitalism, the lingering effects of colonisation and points of conflict in contemporary New Zealand. In the video below, excerpts from his work are interspersed with discussion about his working processes, including his consultation with Māori over the use of the Raukura peace symbol left by the prophets Te Whiti-o-Rongomai and Tohu Kakahi of Parihaka.

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