Circuit Podcast

Posted Sep 23, 2021
By Thomasin Sleigh

Artists' Moving Image in the pandemic era—a glut of compromise or new horizons for exhibition and accessibility? Three curators and arts professionals discuss a shift from showing in small towns, major cities, and institutions to the online space, and what the future might bring.

Posted Oct 8, 2020
By Mark Williams

"What's good for Māori is good for everyone" - Qiane Matata-Sipu

How do Māori and Pākeha relate to, and value whenua? What are their differing values and how do they intersect? What is the connection between generosity and Tino Rangitiratanga? In this conversation artists Martin Awa Clarke Langdon (Waikato-Tainui, Ngāti Whāwhākia, Ngāti Hikairo, Kāi Tahu), Rebecca Hobbs and Qiane Matata-Sipu (Te Wai-o-hua, Waikato-Tainui) discuss art, activism and mutual wellbeing for Māori and Tauiwi.

The conversation takes place in the context of recent disputes over Ihumātao, a North Island site currently the subject of dispute between land developers and mana whenua.

Posted Sep 4, 2020
By Mark Williams

In the second part of our podcast series Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image, host Robbie Handcock speaks to Laura Duffy and Aliyah Winter about recent collaborations, and how to image queer lives, queer histories, queer youth.

Laura Duffy on CIRCUIT
Aliyah Winter on CIRCUIT

Catalogue Notes

Posted Aug 6, 2020
By Mark Williams

In this interview film-maker M D Brown discusses three short films he made between 2000-2004, inspired by the stream of consciousness technique of modernist European writers including James Joyce and Samuel Beckett.

Each film featured the voice of a lone male, ruminating on late night memories of murky events and personal relationships whose character has been shaped by the passage of time. Using a visual technique of fleeting images interrupted by black, Brown sought to evoke the nature of memory as a subjective series of affective images flickering across the mind's eye.

Posted Jul 29, 2020
By Robbie Handcock

Popular Glory: Contemporary Queerness and the Moving Image is a new four-part podcast series hosted by Pōneke artist Robbie Handcock, interviewing a range of Aotearoa artists working in moving image who employ queerness as identity, content and strategy.

In Episode One, we speak to Berlin-based Tāmaki Makaurau artist ZK Steiner-Fox. Leading from their work Popular Glory, we discuss how the horror movie format—with all its tensions as well as its tropes—is used in ZK’s work to examine the impact of queer coding, classic Hollywood morality and the everyday terror of navigating contemporary media.

Posted Jul 28, 2020
By Mark Williams

Recently we invited film maker Sean Grattan and academic Manuel Shvartzberg Carrió to revisit Sean's 2012 film HADHAD, whose depiction of an unwelcome visitor now seems oddly prescient of a world dealing with Covid 19 and authoritarian politics. Ostensibly a horror movie, HADHAD depicts a group of American suburbanites whose lives are upended by a mysterious visitor. Neither human nor animal, the HADHAD crouches silently, offering no clues to its’ purpose or origin.

Posted Jun 30, 2020
By Mark Williams

In this pod Moya Lawson speaks with Tanya Te Miringa Te Rorarangi Ruka and Martin Awa Clarke Langdon; two artists currently exhibiting public artworks in Wellington which celebrate Matariki, a star cluster used traditionally for ancestral navigation, timing the seasons and a marker of the Māori new year. Listen to Martin discuss his illuminated stills on the Courtenay Place lightboxes, and Tanya discuss her video on Masons Screen, Kōhatu Tipua (Supernatural Stones).

Posted Apr 29, 2020
By Mark Williams

In moments of change there is a window to act. How do we organise our politics around the new situation? How do we organise our institutions? What role should artists play in this? How do we move beyond short term solutions to long term ones? And if the next crisis - Climate Change - is going to change daily life for all of us, what do we need to put in place *now* for the long term?

Posted Apr 20, 2020
By Mark Williams

Is time out the most productive time of all?

Darcell Apelu talks to Mark Williams about a recent residency in Yorkshire spent contemplating her practice. She also discusses a trip to her father's homeland of Niue, two resulting videos, and previous performance works which drew on the body, ideas of 'otherness' and her career as an international wood chopper.

Watch Darcell's video work on CIRCUIT here.

Posted Mar 17, 2020
By Mark Williams

"HIV doesn’t have agency, it’s not alive like we are, it’s just a piece of programming, but... in empathising with it, I have gained a greater respect for it" - John Walter

Posted Dec 19, 2019
By Mark Williams

In this CIRCUIT Cast 2019 review we welcome Judy Darragh (artist), Remco de Blaaij (Director, Artspace Aotearoa), Becky Hemus (Writer) and Lucinda Bennett (writer). Our panellists gather to discuss the notable shows, artists, works and provocations of the Aotearoa artworld in the year past; in the moving image and every other discipline you can name.

Among the highlights celebrated are Māori Moving Image: An Open Archive, works by Natasha Matila-Smith, Sorawit Songsataya, Selina Ershadi, Ruth Buchanan's ambitious response to the Govett Brewster's 50th anniversary.

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