Commentary

Interview Posted May 21, 2019
By Bridget Reweti
Robert Jahnke (Ngāi Taharora, Te Whānau a Iritekura, Te Whānau a Rakairo o Ngāti Porou) Still from Te Utu (1979) 16mm animation transferred to digital video

Commissioned by CIRCUIT and Toi Māori Aotearoa - Māori Arts New Zealand, Uiuinga is a four-part series in which Bridget Reweti interviews four Māori artists about their work in the moving image. In this conversation Robert Jahnke discusses his 1979 animated film Te Utu, which he made a student in California to "commemorate the importance of Rangi and Papa" and Cliff Whiting's mural Te Wehenga o Rangi rāua ko Papa (1969-76).

Podcast Posted May 3, 2019
By Mark Amery

"Different Art Fairs have different roles" - Stephanie Post, co-director Auckland Art Fair

 
Writing Posted Apr 28, 2019
By Amy Weng

"Although university art galleries globally are no longer bound by traditional demands to be “teaching” facilities, how do we distinguish between what is ‘educational’ and what simply raises the profile of a campus? Have the lines between university art galleries and their civic counterparts become too blurred? Does it matter?" - Amy Weng

Podcast Posted Apr 17, 2019
By Mark Williams

Peter Wareing is a New Zealand artist who has spent most of the past 30 years working in the USA and now in the UK.

Writing Posted Mar 29, 2019
By Ioana Gordon-Smith

As From the Shore opens at Pataka in Wellington, we revisit curator Ioana Gordon-Smith's address to the 2018 CIRCUIT Symposium on the work of pioneering Māori film-makers Barry Barclay and Merata Mita, and their influence on contemporary practitioners now. For more texts and conversation around these artists, download our Symposium e-book here.

Podcast Posted Mar 21, 2019
By Mark Williams

“The problem is with bureaucrats who are preventing us from seeing the content” - Luke Fowler

Recently in Wellington for the opening of the Adam Art Gallery installation Passages, Scottish film-maker Luke Fowler sat down with Mark Williams at City Gallery Wellington for a wide-ranging interview on his filmed portraits of experimental musicians, the revolutionary potential of the past, the responsibility of the spectator, the plight of millenials and bypassing gatekeepers.

Writing Posted Mar 7, 2019
By Stephanie Beth

In this long form essay film-maker Stephanie Beth reflects on two films made in 1977 and 1980 that sought to give voice to women, finding a kindred contemporary spirit in Ruth Buchanan’s Walter Prize winning installation BAD VISUAL SYSTEMS (2018). This essay is included in the free CIRCUIT E-book The Time of the Now, 118 pages of papers and discussion from the 2018 CIRCUIT Symposium. Get it here.

Writing Posted Mar 5, 2019
By Mark Williams

CIRCUIT is proud to present The Time of the Now e-book. 118 pages of interviews, presentations and discussion from the 2018 CIRCUIT Symposium. Free to download from the CIRCUIT website.

“…what has been happening today across some of the presentations is the articulation of a vision of what documentary could or should be, or how it could relate to an audience. That doesn’t always happen. In fact, it often doesn’t happen.” - Dr. Erika Balsom

Writing Posted Feb 27, 2019
By Matariki Williams

Nearly 250 years ago, a large ship made its way from the Society Islands, charting south to its destination of Terra Australis. On board was a man who came to be revered, and loved, by the people he met. He was of course Tupaia, a tohunga, rangatira, ringatoi from the island of Ra’iatea.

Writing Posted Feb 7, 2019
By Becky Hemus

"Lee is at once obstinate about the implicit labour that artists need to perform, and keenly aware that it is largely necessary in order to succeed. His reticence signals an admission that he is less commercially successful than he might wish to one day be, and a tenaciousness in his desire to carve his own path by producing art in a way that is authentic to him." - Becky Hemus

Writing Posted Jan 25, 2019
By Lana Lopesi

“Following in the footsteps of a suite of Indigenous futurist artists from Turtle Island to Hawaiʻi, Rands' animation uses traditional practices to imagine radical change.” - Lana Lopesi

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